Plenary Speakers

    1. Dr. Alfonso Farina
    Alfonso Farina LFIEEE, FIET, FREng, Fellow of EURASIP, received the degree in Electronic Engineering from the University of Rome (IT) in 1973. In 1974, he joined Selenia, then Selex ES, where he became Director of the Analysis of Integrated Systems Unit and subsequently Director of Engineering of the Large Business Systems Division. In 2012, he was Senior VP and Chief Technology Officer of the company, reporting directly to the President. From 2013 to 2014, he was senior advisor to the CTO. He retired in October 2014. From 1979 to 1985, he was also professor of "Radar Techniques" at the University of Naples (IT). He is the author of more than 600 peer-reviewed technical publications and of books and monographs (published worldwide), some of them also translated in to Russian and Chinese. Some of the most significant awards he's received include: (2004) Leader of the team that won the First Prize of the first edition of the Finmeccanica Award for Innovation Technology, out of more than 330 submitted projects by the Companies of Finmeccanica Group; (2005) International Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, U.K., and the fellowship was presented to him by HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh; (2010) IEEE Dennis J. Picard Medal for Radar Technologies and Applications for "Continuous, Innovative, Theoretical, and Practical Contributions to Radar Systems and Adaptive Signal Processing Techniques"; (2012) Oscar Masi award for the AULOS "green" radar by the Italian Industrial Research Association (AIRI); (2014) IET Achievement Medal for "Outstanding contributions to radar system design, signal, data and image processing, and data fusion". He is a Visiting Professor at University College London (UCL), Dept. of Electronics, CTIF (Center for TeleInFrastructures) Industry Advisory Chair, and a Distinguished Lecturer (DL) of IEEE AESS. He is consultant to Leonardo S.p.A. "Land & Naval Defence Electronics Division".

    TITLE:
    40 years of tracking for radar systems: a cross-disciplinary academic and industry point of view
    ABSTRACT:
    The talk will describe the intertwined R&D activities, along several decades, between academia and industry in conceiving and implementing - also on live radar systems - tracking algorithms for targets in civilian as well as defence and security applications. We trace back from the alpha-beta adaptive filter to modern random set filters passing thru Kalman algorithm (in its many embodiments), Multiple Model filters, Multiple Hypothesis Tracking, Joint Probabilistic Data Association, Particle filter for nonlinear non Gaussian models. Fusion from heterogeneous collocated as well as non-collocated sensor data are also mentioned. Applications to land, naval and airborne sensors are considered. Active as well as passive radar experiences are overviewed. The description will be a balanced look to both mathematical aspects as well as practical implementation issues including mitigation of real life system limitations.
    2. Dr. David Kershaw
    David Kershaw David Kershaw started in the Australian Defence Department as a Cadet Engineer with Navy Material in 1987 and transferred to the then Defence Science and Technology Organisation in 1989 following completion of a B.Sc(Hons) in Physics and a B.E in Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering from Monash University. From 1989 through to 1999 he worked in the area of torpedoes, torpedo defence and undersea warfare, covering circuit analysis through signal processing to operations research. IN 1995 he was awarded a PhD from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology on the topic Adaptive Waveform Selection for Tracking Systems. Dr Kershaw was appointed as Head of the Torpedoes & Torpedo Defence Group in 1999 before also assuming responsibility for Undersea Warfare Operations Analysis in 2002. During 2003 and 2004 he was the Navy Scientific Adviser before returning to DSTO Edinburgh as the Air Warfare Destroyer Science & Technology Adviser in 2005 and 2006. He then undertook a series of Science and Technology Leadership roles covering support for submarine, surface ship and undersea weapon programs. This involved both defence acquisition project support and the instigation of longer term research projects. In early 2012 Dr Kershaw was promoted to Research Leader with responsibility initially for scientific support for submarine combat systems and then assuming responsibility for defence science applicable to undersea command and control. David was appointed as Chief Maritime Division with Defence Science and Technology in May 2016. In this role he is responsible for Defence Science and Technology Group's research in Maritime Platform Sciences and Undersea Warfare System Sciences. He is also the Domain Program Manager - Maritime and is thus responsible for overseeing the delivery the Defence Science and Technology Maritime program.

    TITLE:
    What is the right level of autonomy for Undersea Operations?
    ABSTRACT:
    The undersea environment presents a number of unique challenges for the successful implementation of autonomous systems and advanced information sciences. Some of these challenges include low data rates, a complex varying propagation environment, lack of training data, and incomplete knowledge of adversary characteristics. All of these have led to the failures in systems and a slower than expected take up of autonomous systems in some undersea warfare domains. In many cases these failures were due to attempting to replace the human, rather than taking a broader systems view of how to use autonomy and information sciences to augment or better support the human. Examples will be provided to explore several key challenges for undersea operations, including the use of autonomous systems for littoral operations, tracking and data fusion for anti-submarine warfare and some thoughts for how to address the problem of information overload that faces the warfare teams on modern Naval platforms.